Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo

Leonardo da Vinci:

Leonardo da Vinci was a talented Italian painter, sculpture, architect, musician, engineer, inventor, anatomist, geologist, cartographer, botanist, and writer who lived in the Renaissance. He was born on the 15th of April 1452. He is widely considered to be one of the greatest painters of all time and perhaps the most diversely talented person ever to have lived.

Some of his art work is in museums like The Last Supper, Mona Lisa, and many more. Leonardo was so busy with his works that many of them did not get completed and some of those are one of his most famous art works that are in museums, for an example The Last Supper. Some of his art work failed, to be successful in lasting a lot longer in a wall. In 1466, at the age of fourteen, Leonardo was apprenticed to the artist Andrea di Cione, known as Verrocchio, whose workshop was “one of the finest in Florence”. Other famous painters apprenticed or associated with the workshop include Domenico GhirlandaioPeruginoBotticelli, and Lorenzo di Credi. Leonardo would have been exposed to both theoretical training and a vast range of technical skills including drafting, chemistry, metallurgy, metal working, plaster casting, leather working, mechanics and carpentry as well as the artistic skills of drawing, painting, sculpting and modelling.

Michelangelo:

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni was born on the 6th of March in 1475. He was an Italian Sculptor, painter, architect, engineer, and poet. He was titled of the archetypal Renaissance man, along with his fellow Italian Leonardo da Vinci. He was mostly famous for his sculpturing. His most famous art work was the statue of David. Michelangelo was considered the greatest living artist in his lifetime, and since has been held to be one of the greatest artists of all time. A number of his works in painting, sculpture, and architecture rank among the most famous in existence. His output in every field during his long life was prodigious; when the sheer volume of correspondence, sketches, and reminiscences that survive is also taken into account, he is the best-documented artist of the 16th century.

Two of his best-known works, the Pietà and David, were sculpted before he turned thirty. Despite his low opinion of painting, Michelangelo also created two of the most influential works in fresco in the history of Western art: the scenes from Genesis on the ceiling and The Last Judgment on the altar wall of the Sistine Chapel in Rome. As an architect, Michelangelo pioneered the Mannerist style at the Laurentian Library. At the age of 74 he succeeded Antonio da Sangallo the Younger as the architect of St. Peter’s Basilica. Michelangelo transformed the plan, the western end being finished to Michelangelo’s design, the dome being completed after his death with some modification.

In a demonstration of Michelangelo’s unique standing, he was the first Western artist whose biography was published while he was alive.[2]Two biographies were published of him during his lifetime; one of them, by Giorgio Vasari, proposed that he was the pinnacle of all artistic achievement since the beginning of the Renaissance, a viewpoint that continued to have currency in art history for centuries.

In his lifetime he was also often called Il Divino (“the divine one”).[3] One of the qualities most admired by hiscontemporaries was his terribilità, a sense of awe-inspiring grandeur, and it was the attempts of subsequent artists to imitate[4] Michelangelo’s impassioned and highly personal style that resulted in Mannerism, the next major movement in Western art after the High Renaissance.

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